How does ADHD affect children and adults?

What is ADHD, and how does it affect your body? The abbreviation of ADHD stands for attention deficit disorder, which affects children and adults as well. ADHD symptoms can differ between each child on the ways it impacts their lives. ADHD is commonly known for its inability to sustained attention with classwork and home tasks. A child may demonstrate disruptive behaviors by not staying still or maintaining attention within the classroom. That child may also have another behavior or mental diagnosis like obsessive-compulsive disorder.  This child cannot perceive their actions wrong, but it can be harmful to their mental state.  The parents and school can seek support from a behavioral health specialist within the school and home. A behavioral health specialist provides guidance, modifications, and training to help manage their social world behaviors. An adolescent may utilize behavioral specialists to increase independence by obtaining a job or their studies. The child can modify their classroom behaviors by occupational therapy for sensory breaks, fidgets, and other adaptions. Furthermore, a child can seek guidance from a psychiatrist for a prescription of Adderall, which is a medication to treat ADHD; the medication can increase their attention with functional tasks within a classroom or home.

ADHD may affect an adult’s emotions, concentration, and thinking, which can inhibit functioning with everyday tasks.  An adult with ADHD can have an attention span of less than a minute with work or everyday tasks. An adult may have increase distractions, which can affect their ability to focus throughout the day. There is an alternative approach to manage symptoms by utilizing compensatory mechanisms to help with ADHD. An adult may utilize a structured routine, writing notes on paper, and calendar book to stay on task within their world. Some adults prefer quiet areas to increase concentration with work and life tasks. There are several ways to utilize compensatory strategies to maintain attention and organization with tasks. The majority of adults with ADHD utilize medication to maintain focus on the everyday task; found it helpful to decrease their symptoms.

Adults have been misdiagnosed with either emotional dysregulation or borderline personality disorder, but they have ADHD the whole time.  Those diagnoses are very similar to each other by their symptoms of emotions, decrease attention, and wondering thoughts. The problem lines are that there is not an actual assessment of clinically diagnosed ADHD within an adult. A study was done with a group of French people with these diagnoses of ADHD, borderline personality, and emotional regulation to compare them. They found many similarities between each of the diagnoses, where they found people with ADHD had a better grasp on global functioning. A person with a borderline personality disorder can present difficulties with managing emotions and behavioral disturbances, which sounds like ADHD because they are so similar that it is hard to distinguish.

References

Vetrini, E. (2019). Everything You Need to Know About ADHD | Access Health. YouTube.

https://youtu.be/Ahk_RtG4gxs

Vijverberg, R., Ferdinand, R., Beekman, A., & van Meijel, B. (2020). Unmet care needs of children with ADHD. PLOS ONE15(1), e0228049. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0228049

 Barkley B. (2017). ADHD and Emotional Dysregulation: What You Need to Know [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kew2JhKq3Y&feature=share

Rüfenacht, E., Euler, S., Prada, P., Nicastro, R., Dieben, K., Hasler, R., Pham, E., Perroud, N., & Weibel, S. (2019). Emotion dysregulation in adults suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a comparison with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation6(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40479-019-0108-1

BuzzFeed. (2015, December 9). What ADHD Feels Like. YouTube. https://youtu.be/NL483G4xKu0

Reinhold JA. Adult ADHD: A Review of the Clinical Presentation, Challenges, and Treatment Options. Psychiatric Times. 2015;32(10):1-8. Accessed November 7, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ccm&AN=110842402&site=ehost-live

 

The affect of ADHD on children and adults.

The abbreviation of ADHD stands for attention deficit disorder, which affects children and adults as well. ADHD symptoms can differ between each child on the ways it impacts their lives. ADHD is commonly known for its inability to sustained attention with classwork and home tasks. A child may demonstrate disruptive behaviors by not staying still or maintaining attention within the classroom. That child may also have another behavior or mental diagnosis like obsessive-compulsive disorder.  This child cannot perceive their actions wrong, but it can be harmful to their mental state.  The parents and school can seek support from a behavioral health specialist within the school and home. A behavioral health specialist provides guidance, modifications, and training to help manage their social world behaviors. An adolescent may utilize behavioral specialists to increase independence by obtaining a job or their studies. The child can modify their classroom behaviors by occupational therapy for sensory breaks, fidgets, and other adaptions. Furthermore, a child can seek guidance from a psychiatrist for a prescription of Adderall, which is a medication to treat ADHD; the medication can increase their attention with functional tasks within a classroom or home.

ADHD may affect an adult’s emotions, concentration, and thinking, which can inhibit functioning with everyday tasks.  An adult with ADHD can have an attention span of less than a minute with work or everyday tasks. An adult may have increase distractions, which can affect their ability to focus throughout the day. There is an alternative approach to manage symptoms by utilizing compensatory mechanisms to help with ADHD. An adult may utilize a structured routine, writing notes on paper, and calendar book to stay on task within their world. Some adults prefer quiet areas to increase concentration with work and life tasks. There are several ways to utilize compensatory strategies to maintain attention and organization with tasks. The majority of adults with ADHD utilize medication to maintain focus on the everyday task; found it helpful to decrease their symptoms.

Adults have been misdiagnosed with either emotional dysregulation or borderline personality disorder, but they have ADHD the whole time.  Those diagnoses are very similar to each other by their symptoms of emotions, decrease attention, and wondering thoughts. The problem lines are that there is not an actual assessment of clinically diagnosed ADHD within an adult. A study was done with a group of French people with these diagnoses of ADHD, borderline personality, and emotional regulation to compare them. They found many similarities between each of the diagnoses, where they found people with ADHD had a better grasp on global functioning. A person with a borderline personality disorder can present difficulties with managing emotions and behavioral disturbances, which sounds like ADHD because they are so similar that it is hard to distinguish.

References

Vetrini, E. (2019). Everything You Need to Know About ADHD | Access Health. YouTube. https://youtu.be/Ahk_RtG4gxs

Vijverberg, R., Ferdinand, R., Beekman, A., & van Meijel, B. (2020). Unmet care needs of children with ADHD. PLOS ONE15(1), e0228049. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0228049

 Barkley B. (2017). ADHD and Emotional Dysregulation: What You Need to Know [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kew2JhKq3Y&feature=share

Rüfenacht, E., Euler, S., Prada, P., Nicastro, R., Dieben, K., Hasler, R., Pham, E., Perroud, N., & Weibel, S. (2019). Emotion dysregulation in adults suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a comparison with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation6(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40479-019-0108-1

BuzzFeed. (2015, December 9). What ADHD Feels Like. YouTube. https://youtu.be/NL483G4xKu0

Reinhold JA. Adult ADHD: A Review of the Clinical Presentation, Challenges, and Treatment Options. Psychiatric Times. 2015;32(10):1-8. Accessed November 7, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ccm&AN=110842402&site=ehost-live

Hypertension: What I need to know

What is Hypertension?

Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a chronic medical condition regarding the force of the blood against artery walls. Hypertension is a sign that the heart and blood vessels are working harder than they need to.

        • Hypertension is diagnosed when the systolic reading, the top number, of your blood pressure > 140 and the diastolic, the bottom number, is >90

What are the Symptoms?

Most people with high blood pressure have no signs or symptoms, even if blood pressure readings reach dangerously high levels.

A few people with high blood pressure may have headaches, shortness of breath or nosebleeds.

How do I get Hypertension?

For some, there isn’t a reason they get hypertension, while others get it due to diet and stress. Some will develop it due to underlying conditions like: Obstructive sleep apnea, Kidney problems, Adrenal gland tumors, Thyroid problems, Certain defects you’re born with (congenital) in blood vessels, Certain medications, such as birth control pills, cold remedies, decongestants, over-the-counter pain relievers and some prescription drugs, Illegal drugs, such as cocaine and amphetamines.

How do I prevent Hypertension?

Prevention is key! Reduce sodium intake, exercise daily, smoking reduction/cessation.

I am worried I have Hypertension. Now what?

Make an appointment with your primary health provider to discuss your concern. Possibly he/she will only need to guide you in making lifestyle changes or they may suggest beginning anti-hypertension medication. Regardless of the plan of care, it is important that you do not ignore your high blood pressure. Long term hypertension can be deadly if not controlled.

Still unsure about Hypertension?

Watch this quick video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjTMZ_sm0LQ

Vaping: A dangerous Habit?


By: Vaping360

What is vaping anyway?

Vaping is a method of inhaling and exhaling an aerosol. This aerosol is often called a vapor that is produced by an e-cigarette or other devices. Vaping devices use liquids containing nicotine and other substances that are heated, turning the liquid into a thick aerosol. Vaping devices contain four different parts: A cartridge that holds the liquid, a mouth piece used to inhale the liquid, a heating element and a power source, usually a battery. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4154203/

Difference between vapor and aerosol: A vapor refers to the gaseous state of a substance like water that contains little or no particles. 
An Aerosol is a suspension of tiny particles of a solid, liquid, or both that are in a gas.

Is Vaping a safe alternative to Cigarettes?

Vaping is a relatively new phenomenon that is increasing in popularity, especially in teens. In the last few decades, healthcare communities have fought to decrease smoking in adults and youth. Vaping devices are now threatening this progress. Healthcare officials initially thought that vaping devices were less dangerous than tobacco cigarettes, and could provide a safer alternative. Vaping may be an alternative to cigarettes; however, a safer alternative is incorrect. The CDC reports that vaping devices offer the same dangers as cigarettes just in smaller doses and over a more extended period. https://nsuworks.nova.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1015&context=occ_stuarticles

What’s in the liquid?

E-liquid is the ingredient used in most vaper devices and usually consists of propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, flavorings, nicotine. However, other toxic chemicals were discovered by The U.S Food and Drug Administration, including carcinogens, formaldehyde, and Diethylene glycol an ingredient found in antifreeze. https://nsuworks.nova.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1015&context=occ_stuarticles

How is vaping bad for you?

Long-term and harmful effects from vaping are not well researched; however, according to the CDC, the aerosol produced from vaping devices contain unstable organic compounds. These compounds are resistant to protective mechanisms in the respiratory system. When the aerosol is inhaled, dozens of tiny particles travel deep into the lungs and cause issues with breathing. https://www.rdhmag.com/home/article/16409913/e-cigarettes-vaping-and-chairside-education

Facts from the FDA

  • Nicotine addiction in youth is rising due to the popularity of vaping devices.
  • Longe-term effects from vaping are unknown
  • It is unclear if vaping is effective in helping people quit smoking cigarettes
  • It is unclear if vaping is less harmful then smoking traditional cigarettes 
  • It is unclear of the influence it may have as a “gateway” to smoking cigarettes
  • Manufacturers have targeted kids in their marketing of vaping products.
  • Vaping is not safe

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/fda-voices-perspectives-fda-leadership-and-experts/how-fda-regulating-e-cigarettes

The harmful effects of vaping are not well-researched. Debates continue whether or not vaping is a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes, and help adults kick the smoking habit. The questions answered show that vaping is risky and can cause serious health problems. Vaping products target youth and have proved to be effective with a dramatic increase in use among teens and adolescents. The truth is that vaping is a dangerous habit. Although changes have been implemented stricter regulations and more research are needed. We need to protect the health of our children and not let vaping become the next tobacco story. 

References

Arnold, C. (2014). Vaping and Health: What Do We Know about E-Cigarettes? Environmental Health Perspectives, 122(9). doi: 10.1289/ehp.122-a244

Prudovsky, D. (2019). Saying No to Vaping: What you should know about the dangers of e-cigarettes. Dental Assistant88(2), 10–11. 

Sherry, J. S., Blackstad, N. M., & Wheatley, K. S. (2017). E Cigarettes, Vaping and Chairside Education. RDH, 37(1), 45–52